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CIELITO F. HABITO

No Free Lunch: Changing economies

January 10, 2020

The world's economies, whether large or small, have been changing, and with it, the nature of trade has changed dramatically as well. In its latest Economic Policy Monitor, the Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS) focuses on the ongoing "new globalization," aka Globalization 4.0, and notes changing economic structures to be one of its key features.

Read more: https://opinion.inquirer.net/126508/changing-economies#ixzz6JpHIWxLN


CIELITO F. HABITO

No Free Lunch: A war-driven economy?

January 07, 2020

Why has US President Donald Trump raised the likelihood of another major war? Is it to divert attention from his impeachment, as already being guessed by many? Is it to help boost the US economy, now threatened by the unfolding consequences of his trade war with China? It need not be an either-or matter, as both could well have been in mind, among other motivations, as they assessed the wider implications of the assassination of Iran's top general that Trump readily owned up to.

Read more: https://opinion.inquirer.net/126447/a-war-driven-economy#ixzz6JpH2jeMM


EDILBERTO C. DE JESUS

[ANALYSIS] Writing contracts on water

January 06, 2020

Critical issues surrounding the Manila Water and Maynilad contracts with government threaten not just the water concessionaires but other current and potential public-private partnership projects We enjoy no 2020 vision on the ultimate consequences of the water concession controversy ignited late last year by President Duterte. The trigger was his order reported on December 4, 2019 to file charges that may include economic sabotage and plunder against those involved in the original 1997 contracts and their 15-year extension in 2009.

Read more: https://www.rappler.com/thought-leaders/248566-analysis-writing-contracts-on-water


SAMIRA GUTOC

A Girl from Marawi: Women Leading and Men Leading Women's Issues Too

January 05, 2020

When 2019 Miss Universe Miss Zozibini of South Africa was asked about what to tell young women these days. She answered: "I think the most important thing we should be teaching young girls today is leadership. It's something that has been lacking in young girls and women for a very long time, not because we don't want to but because of what society has labeled women to be."

Read more: https://opinion.inquirer.net/126384/us-or-china-choose-your-poison


EDILBERTO C. DE JESUS

Business Matters: US or China? Choose your poison

January 04, 2020

Thus might "Realist" theorists of international relations respond: Great Powers behave the same way. And President Duterte will probably concur. China routinely violates the country's exclusive economic zone and abuses Filipino fishermen. But he correctly points out that the United States had also exploited the Philippines' weakness to secure its economic and security objectives.China and the United States have followed the same historical trajectory. From 13 settlements along the Atlantic coast, the Americans spread west across the continent, achieving their Manifest Destiny through purchase and war against indigenous tribes and against France and Mexico. China's spread across the Asian heartland, achieved over a longer period, allowed the cultural assimilation of the diverse communities it conquered. Hence, the expansion of Han China appeared as an internal process of consolidation, although not completely consummated in Xinjiang and Tibet. Both Great Powers gained control of their respective continents through a process punctuated by violence and war.

Read more: https://opinion.inquirer.net/126384/us-or-china-choose-your-poison


JUAN MIGUEL LUZ

Using Pisa for PH education goal

December 14, 2019

The 2018 Programme for International Student Assessment (Pisa) results have been released for the Philippines and the results are dismal. The country's 15-year-olds tested as a group scored lowest among the 79 countries in reading and second lowest in science and mathematics. Pisa is a worldwide study that evaluates education systems in OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) member and nonmember countries every three years.

Read more: https://opinion.inquirer.net/125874/using-pisa-for-ph-education-goals#ixzz6KD0RGg8u


RONALD U. MENDOZA

To Boost Its Economy, the Philippines Can't Forgo Human Rights Protections

December 14, 2019

Rule of law matters for economic development, and protecting the sanctity of contracts and upholding human rights are both part and parcel of the rule of law. It seems odd to have to write an article asserting this point: but such are the times we are in. My target audience for this piece include all those fellow economists who seem to believe the Philippines can still pursue development even under a regime that fails to uphold the rule of law, and more specifically fails to protect human rights. According to some, "as long we protect the sanctity of contracts our economy will grow." This is a false dichotomy, and an overly narrow and shallow understanding of the rule of law and institutions. A holistic institutional environment that fails to protect human rights also fails to uphold contracts. The downward spiral involving failure to protect both human rights and contractual rights is something the Philippines has seen before - during the initially welcomed and later widely condemned rule of dictator Ferdinand Marcos in the 1970s and '80s. It probably bears reiterating even more recent evidence if people have forgotten.

Read more: https://thediplomat.com/2019/12/to-boost-its-economy-the-philippines-cant-forgo-human-rights-protect


LORETTA ANN P. ROSALES

Duterte officials' paranoia is 'singularly myopic'

November 22, 2019

I would like to refer presidential spokesperson Salvador Panelo and other officials of government, who have negatively reacted to the widely covered daily consultations Vice President Leni Robredo has been having with local agencies of government, to Articles IV, V, VI and VII covering Sections 41 to 53 of Republic Act No. 9165 or the Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002.

Read more: https://opinion.inquirer.net/125385/duterte-officials-paranoia-is-singularly-myopic#ixzz6KDCWpAx0


PHILIP ARNOLD TUANO, Czar Joseph Castillo, Ramon Clarete and Marjorie Muyrong

Impacts of TRAIN fuel excise taxes on employment and poverty

October 11, 2019

The first package of the Tax Reform for Accelerated Inclusion (TRAIN 1) Law took effect in January 2018. This package focuses on adjustments in income brackets and personal income tax rates, excise tax rates, and value-added tax coverage, among others. In general, personal income taxes are lowered for most taxpayers and raised for the higher income individuals. Meanwhile, among the commodities covered by excise tax adjustments are fossil fuels and petroleum products, automobiles, and sugar-sweetened beverages.

Read more: https://www.think-asia.org/bitstream/handle/11540/11301/pidspn1910.pdf?sequence=1


PHILIP ARNOLD TUANO, Czar Joseph Castillo, Ramon Clarete and Marjorie Muyrong

Effects of TRAIN fuel excise taxes on goods and prices

October 10, 2019

In January 2018, the first package of the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion (TRAIN 1) Law took effect. Among others, it adjusted income brackets and personal income tax rates, excise tax rates, and value-added tax coverage. The increase in excise taxes in selected commodities is a complementary measure to the reduction of personal income tax rates. Specifically covered by excise tax adjustments are fossil fuels and petroleum products, automobiles, and sugar-sweetened beverages

Read more: https://www.think-asia.org/bitstream/handle/11540/11302/pidspn1911.pdf?sequence=1.